If you’re a top-notch editor with a deep understanding of how college admissions works—including standardized test preparation, personal statement requirements, supplemental essay requirements, applicant statistics, and even financial aid—then you might be able to snag a rather well-paying job as a college consultant. Some families are willing and able to pay through the nose to make sure their kids submit the best possible applications to their dream schools….
Now, this isn't about some get-rich-quick method here. If you want to get rich quick, forget about trying to do it on the internet. Sure, Facebook ads are all the craze, but without a serious understanding of the mechanics behind sales funnels and conversion optimizations, which only comes after years and years of in-the-trenches work in the internet marketing field, you're largely wasting your time trying to "get rich quick."
Create a killer course experience: With your course validated and in the works, you need to figure out how people will take it. Most course creators choose to host their courses from their own websites. This way, they get all the value of bringing customers back to their site on a regular basis. I host my own courses from a subdomain on my own site so I can easily add more. The course experience is incredibly important as well. And after trying most of the solutions, I highly recommend Teachable—an online platform designed specifically for courses.
By definition, then, a business that focuses on a niche is addressing a need for a product or service that is not being addressed by mainstream providers. Establishing a niche market give you the opportunity to provide products and services to a group that other businesses have overlooked. You can think of a niche market as a narrowly defined group of potential customers that have specific needs, a subset of a larger group.

Unlike mass audiences, which represent a large number of people, a niche audience is an influential smaller audience.[2] In television, technology and many industrial practices changed with the post-network era, and niche audiences are now in much greater control of what they watch. In this context of greater viewer control, television networks and production companies are trying to discover ways to profit through new scheduling, new shows, and relying on syndication.[citation needed] This practice of "narrowcasting" also allows advertisers to have a more direct audience for their messages.[3]
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