Definition: Minimum Viable Product or MVP is a development technique in which a new product is introduced in the market with basic features, but enough to get the attention of the consumers. The final product is released in the market only after getting sufficient feedback from the product's initial users. Description: Minimum Viable Product or MVP is the most basic version of the product which the company wants to launch in the market. It could be a car, website, TV, or a laptop. By introducing the basic version to the consumers, companies want to gauge the response from prospective consumers or buyers. This technique helps them in making the final product much better. With the help of MVP concept, the research or the marketing team will come to know where the product is lacking and or what are its strengths or weaknesses. MVP has three distinct features. One is that it will have enough features for consumers to purchase the product (it becomes easier for the company to market it), the other is that it will have some sort of a feedback mechanism wherein users would be able to send their feedback about the product. And, lastly it should have enough future benefits for consumers who to adopt the product first (Google gave free upgrade of its OS to all Nexus users). The idea is to get feedback from the consumers which will in turn help in making the desired changes in the final product. MVP actually tests the usage scenario rather that is much for more helpful for the company to make changes to the final product. Let's understand the concept with the help of an example. MVP is a popular concept in the online space, where a website is launched with basic features to find out how consumers respond to the product displayed on the website. It could be a consumable product, daily use product or even a service provided by a website provider. The idea is to start small and then take cues from the users as to what exactly are they expecting from the product. Some of the noted examples are Dropbox, Groupon, Zappos, etc.
2) Another booming niche market is catering to seniors - 75 million Americans were born in the years between 1946 and 1964 (the so-called baby-boomer generation) and are now retiring or headed for retirement and according to research by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) nearly 90% of them wish to continue to live at home in their communities. This has opened up many opportunities for small businesses that cater to this niche market:
Businesses that serve a niche market tend to be unique, such as a cleaning company that uses all natural cleaning products, a gluten-free bakery, or landscaper that creates interesting mowing patterns. Businesses with a unique product or service tend to stand out, and often get featured in media outlets such as talk shows, radio stations, or newspapers.
After creating a plan for the home-based business, the entrepreneur is ready to put the plan in action. One of the earliest steps involves preparing family members and enlisting their support. The loss of a reliable source of income may cause some anxiety or resentment among other members of the household. In addition, the creation of a home office will probably necessitate changes in family members' schedules or lifestyle. Dealing with such issues in advance can help avoid problems later. Another important step is to establish an area of the home as a business office. The most important consideration when choosing a location for a home office is that it allow the entrepreneur room to work comfortably and efficiently without too many distractions. The office should be as physically separate from the living area of the home as possible, and should project an air of professionalism to potential visitors as well as to its occupant.
To find your niche market, think about what you’re best at, what you enjoy doing most for your clients, and the clients you enjoy most. Your niche market can find your business, you could stumble upon your niche, or you could choose a specialty and make it work. Having a firm grasp on the primary goods and services that you provide, and the different segments of your audience will help you to hone your strategy. Don’t be afraid to experiment either. Experimentation is the key to learning, which is the key to growth.
But then you realize that maybe commercial plumbing pays better than residential, or vice versa. Or that only certain tech-savvy people are interested in that ultra 4K giant flat screen TV, while most of your current customers can’t see the different and don’t want to shell out an extra $400. Maybe your marketing services are too expensive for some businesses, or you don’t have the bandwidth to scale campaigns up to several thousand dollars a week the way that larger companies.
There are quite literally hundreds of clever ways to make money online. From taking online surveys, to renting or selling your old clothes, flipping your iPhone to someone in a different country, and even buying low-cost products locally, just to resell them for a higher price on Amazon. There’s truly no shortage of unique ways to make money online.
One way to get started might be to focus on children’s parities, which can be a bit simpler and less stressful to plan than adult get-togethers. Go further into specialization by following kid trends and offering superhero or Frozen parties. Remember that you’ll be competing not just with other party planners but with local restaurants and facilities, so excellent networking skills and a personal touch to your services will be important.
There are two basic markets you can sell to: consumer and business. These divisions are fairly obvious. For example, if you're selling women’s clothing from a retail store, your target market is consumers; if you're selling office supplies, your target market is businesses (this is referred to as “B2B” sales). In some cases—for example, if you run a printing business—you may be marketing to both businesses and individuals.
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