Freelance writing is such a great industry to get involved in if you want to work remotely. There’s plenty of work available and it’s typically one of the most flexible gigs in terms of scheduling. (You can often do the work whenever and wherever you choose.) Even better, it’s pretty easy to get started with a degree or previous writing experience. Read more at Freelance Writing Jobs for Beginners
Have you ever thought of turning your passion into a business? Many businesses offer a wide range of products or services but struggle to become the market leader for each of their offerings. Instead of targeting a broad population, your idea could focus on a small portion of potential customers. Narrowing your scope provides the opportunity to be the best at what you do.
A blog highlights your technical ability and showcases your ability to write blog posts. Your blog can be about different topics than those you write about for your clients. In fact, it should be on a topic that interests you. Visitors will see that you can not only write, but you can also build an online community. A good blog has the potential to earn you many referrals for more clients.[24]
To do that, you have to harbor a few fundamental guiding principles in your mind. Today, if you're at all serious about generating a full-time income (and more) from your online activities, then you need to focus on passive income as opposed to active income. Sure, the active income will help you survive. That's the scarcity mentality at play. But it's the passive income ideas that will help you thrive.
Understand how a niche website works. A niche website focuses on very targeted, specific information. The content must be specific, useful and interesting to your target audience. Successful niche websites get anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 visitors per month.[5] You build content on a particular keyword, and you make passive income with Google Adsense or through affiliate links.[6]
Niche marketing can be used to reach consumers who can be targeted based on various characteristics, such as demographics, hobbies, occupations, or interest in social or political causes. Each niche market defines specific product features -- including design, price, production quality and the demographics that the organization intends to address. Goods and services that are under the niche-marketing umbrella include products for addressing physical conditions (such as dermatitis, dandruff or acne), fitness products to tone specific parts of the body, clothing for specific body types and wedding planning for budget-conscious customers.
In the U.S., ecommerce spending totalled $97.3 billion in the second quarter of 2016 alone, an increase of 4.5 percent from the first quarter of 2016 (U.S. Census Bureau News). Online sales in the United States are expected to reach $523 billion in the next five years, up 56% from $335 billion in 2015, Forrester Research Inc. says. Canadian companies sold more than $136 billion in goods and services online in 2013, up from $122 billion a year earlier, according to Statistics Canada. Obviously more people than ever are shopping online.
Though it may seem like niche marketing and branding could isolate segments of your audience in a negative way, that’s unlikely to happen, especially with good targeting in place. Instead, by creating segmented niches and creating content that appeals to specific interests and pain points, you’ll be more likely to better connect with the exact customers that you want to build relationships with.
Every product cannot be defined by its market niche. The niche market is highly specialized, and aiming to survive among the competition from numerous super companies. Even established companies create products for different niches; Hewlett-Packard has all-in-one machines for printing, scanning and faxing targeted for the home office niche, while at the same time having separate machines with one of these functions for big businesses.[1]
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