While some might think that starting a blog is an arduous effort, when you understand the precise steps you need to take, it becomes far easier. It all starts in the decision of choosing a profitable niche and picking the right domain name. From there, you need to build your offers. You can easily sell things like mini-email courses, full-blown trainings, ebooks, and so on.
One of the biggest business success stories of the 21st Century started out as an “online mixer” for college students. Mark Zuckerberg started Facebook as an Internet forum for Harvard University students to see pictures of and make electronic connections with their classmates. The site was initially marketed exclusively (and very successfully) to college students before exploding onto the cultural and societal landscape in the US and then internationally.
28. Subscription – If you think of something valuable (newsletter, online magazine, etc.) that you can consistently offer on a certain basis (weekly, monthly, etc.), you may want to offer a subscription service. This could be a fee charged each time your product is sent out or on a monthly basis. Either way, this has to be something that your customers can only get by subscribing to your website.
While managing a blog in and of itself won’t net you any money—in fact, it’ll cost you to purchase a domain, upgrade the appearance, and run marketing campaigns—there are a few ways for you to monetize your blog. You could offer up advertising space, which is a useful but typically minor revenue stream, but a lot more money is often found in sponsorships and affiliate marketing.
Keep in mind there are no absolutes. You may be primarily based out of your home but lease space in a shared office environment a few days out of the month. You might take commercial space and telecommute one or two days a week. For many, a blend of the two works best. This past April, Yahoo’s CEO Marissa Mayer said, “People are more productive when they’re alone”¦(but) more collaborative and innovative when they’re together. Some of the best ideas come from pulling two different ideas together.” Perhaps this piece of advice applies to where you choose to work, as well.
“Many people talk about ‘finding’ a niche as if it were something under a rock or at the end of the rainbow, ready-made. That's nonsense,” says Lynda Falkenstein, author of Nichecraft: Using Your Specialness to Focus Your Business, Corner Your Market and Make Customers Seek You Out. Good niches don't just fall into your lap; they must be carefully crafted.
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