Like graphic design, Web design requires skills that can take years to acquire and perfect. But if you have them, the market is there for creating attractive, useful Web sites for all sorts of organizations. Starting a Web-design business does require some up-front investment, particularly in software, although candidates to start Web-design firms might have those applications already.

Definition: Minimum Viable Product or MVP is a development technique in which a new product is introduced in the market with basic features, but enough to get the attention of the consumers. The final product is released in the market only after getting sufficient feedback from the product's initial users. Description: Minimum Viable Product or MVP is the most basic version of the product which the company wants to launch in the market. It could be a car, website, TV, or a laptop. By introducing the basic version to the consumers, companies want to gauge the response from prospective consumers or buyers. This technique helps them in making the final product much better. With the help of MVP concept, the research or the marketing team will come to know where the product is lacking and or what are its strengths or weaknesses. MVP has three distinct features. One is that it will have enough features for consumers to purchase the product (it becomes easier for the company to market it), the other is that it will have some sort of a feedback mechanism wherein users would be able to send their feedback about the product. And, lastly it should have enough future benefits for consumers who to adopt the product first (Google gave free upgrade of its OS to all Nexus users). The idea is to get feedback from the consumers which will in turn help in making the desired changes in the final product. MVP actually tests the usage scenario rather that is much for more helpful for the company to make changes to the final product. Let's understand the concept with the help of an example. MVP is a popular concept in the online space, where a website is launched with basic features to find out how consumers respond to the product displayed on the website. It could be a consumable product, daily use product or even a service provided by a website provider. The idea is to start small and then take cues from the users as to what exactly are they expecting from the product. Some of the noted examples are Dropbox, Groupon, Zappos, etc.
Once you have that problem or need nailed, the next step is to validate that idea and make sure you’ve actually got customers who will pay for it. This means building a minimum viable product, getting objective feedback from real customers, incorporating updates, testing the market for demand, and getting pricing feedback to ensure there’s enough of a margin between your costs and what consumers are willing to pay.

Here’s a good example of how lead sales can work in real life: My second website, Life Insurance by Jeff, brings in a ton of traffic from people who are searching the web to find answers to life insurance questions. While I used to have the website set up so I could sell these people life insurance myself, it was a lot of work to process all the different requests and clients. As a result, I started selling the leads I gathered instead.


Unlike mass audiences, which represent a large number of people, a niche audience is an influential smaller audience.[2] In television, technology and many industrial practices changed with the post-network era, and niche audiences are now in much greater control of what they watch. In this context of greater viewer control, television networks and production companies are trying to discover ways to profit through new scheduling, new shows, and relying on syndication.[citation needed] This practice of "narrowcasting" also allows advertisers to have a more direct audience for their messages.[3]
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