Niche marketing can be used to reach consumers who can be targeted based on various characteristics, such as demographics, hobbies, occupations, or interest in social or political causes. Each niche market defines specific product features -- including design, price, production quality and the demographics that the organization intends to address. Goods and services that are under the niche-marketing umbrella include products for addressing physical conditions (such as dermatitis, dandruff or acne), fitness products to tone specific parts of the body, clothing for specific body types and wedding planning for budget-conscious customers.
For example, a yoga studio might enter mindbodyonline.com (an online scheduling site for fitness and wellness classes) and see that audiences also frequently visit potterybarn.com, anthropologie.com, and urbanoutfitters.com. Because those sites are all boutique-style shops with unique clothes, decor, and gifts, the yoga studio might see this as an opportunity for creating a specialty product shop or campaign just for yoga enthusiasts.
Research individual companies in your desired niche: If possible, it’s always better to become an affiliate directly with a company (if they have an internal affiliate program), as no one else will be dipping into your commission rate. This is the preferred route for most of the prominent affiliate marketers, including Pat Flynn. Unfortunately, it’s also the most work, as you’ll have to do the research yourself to see who offers programs (they’re usually listed in the website footer).
The company’s marketing director took what he learned from those Portland bike messengers and rode it to a remarkable resurgence for Pabst Blue Ribbon. With almost no mass-media advertising or marketing, Pabst sales grew by more than 5 percent the following year. Today, PBR is the unofficial hipster beer of bike-messenger hangouts, campus bars, and underground music clubs across the country.
Most marketing programs offer in-depth courses on product research and how to identify niche markets. This often includes classroom projects using real-world scenarios that provide examples of how niche marketing plans can go from ideas on paper to strategies put into action. Many marketing schools also provide internship opportunities that allow students to work alongside professionals in the field, giving added relevance and impact to their coursework

No business—particularly a small one—can be all things to all people. The more narrowly you can define your target market, the better. This process is known as creating a niche and is key to success for even the biggest companies. Walmart and Tiffany are both retailers, but they have very different niches: Walmart caters to bargain-minded shoppers, while Tiffany appeals to upscale jewelry consumers.
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