There are no office politics. And no dress code! It’s true, you really can work in your pajamas if you want to (although you might feel more productive if you get dressed). Depending on whether you have any employees working with you at home, no one knows what you’re wearing and no one cares. Similarly, there’s no office pecking order and no gamesmanship from other workers.
Pet sitting usually involves going to someone else’s house to take care of furry loved ones. Pet sitting could even involve living in someone’s house while the client is away. You have to think about the types of services you’ll provide and the types of animals you’ll take care of, but generally pet sitting is a low-cost, high-pleasure business idea.
5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs.
2) Another booming niche market is catering to seniors - 75 million Americans were born in the years between 1946 and 1964 (the so-called baby-boomer generation) and are now retiring or headed for retirement and according to research by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) nearly 90% of them wish to continue to live at home in their communities. This has opened up many opportunities for small businesses that cater to this niche market:
How can you make a living as a real social-media expert? Practice. Build an audience for yourself before offering your services to others. Determine your target sector, build your own online presence in that community and start making contact with the social-media elite. Twitter is a great place to start. Keep cranking out content and getting it to the right users, and you’ll find a way to get yourself hired even in an ever-expanding universe.
“Many people talk about ‘finding’ a niche as if it were something under a rock or at the end of the rainbow, ready-made. That's nonsense,” says Lynda Falkenstein, author of Nichecraft: Using Your Specialness to Focus Your Business, Corner Your Market and Make Customers Seek You Out. Good niches don't just fall into your lap; they must be carefully crafted.
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