When researching, if you find a fair number of similar products, but not an overabundance of products -- this means your idea could be profitable. Take a look at the price points of your competitors' products so you can price your own competitively. Resources like Amazon (for products), G2 Crowd (for software), agency directories (for services), and price monitoring tools like PRICEFY.IO are helpful in the process of evaluating your competitors' pricing, and determining prices for your own products and services.
The ongoing niche marketing plan can either be subtle or more obvious depending on the niche's values. PBR’s marketing director started distributing small pieces of the Pabst swag (buttons, hats, pins) to customers to thank them for their business and to help the brand spread. The company also began sponsoring small events that drew the same crowd. There were no billboards, no commercials, and no big advertising splash. The research indicated that the niche appreciated subtle, restrained marketing that relied on word of mouth over aggressive, in-your-face commercial marketing. That familiarity with their niche customers and the company’s fidelity to its word-of-mouth marketing plan led to the now 168-year-old company to build an impressive following among young beer drinkers.
Reference price is also known as competitive pricing, because here the product is sold just below the price of a competitor’s product. Reference price is the cost at which a manufacturer or a store owner sells a particular product, giving a hefty discount compared to its previously advertised price. Description: Reference pricing, in simple terms, is known as that price which users compare with

When a company begins to implement a niche marketing plan, they first attempt to answer important questions that will guide their ongoing efforts. What magazines does the targeted niche read? What radio stations do they listen to? What websites do they have bookmarked? Who do they follow on Twitter? Are their product choices more likely to be influenced by advertising or word of mouth?
With niche marketing especially, getting in front of the right people is more important than getting in front of a lot of people. However, getting in front of a lot of people such as through these media outlets also has its benefits. The more people who know about your business, the more people there are to recommend your business to a friend who fits your niche market.

One of the biggest business success stories of the 21st Century started out as an “online mixer” for college students. Mark Zuckerberg started Facebook as an Internet forum for Harvard University students to see pictures of and make electronic connections with their classmates. The site was initially marketed exclusively (and very successfully) to college students before exploding onto the cultural and societal landscape in the US and then internationally.
My name is Jamie Spencer and I have spent the past 5 years building money making blogs. After growing tired of the 9-5, commuting and never seeing my family I decided that I wanted to make some changes and launched my first blog. Since then I have launched lots of successful niche blogs and after selling my survivalist blog I decided to teach other people how to do the same.
With whom do you want to do business? Be as specific as you can. Identify the geographic range and the types of businesses or customers you want your business to target. If you don’t know whom you want to do business with, you can’t make contact. “You must recognize that you can’t do business with everybody,” Falkenstein cautions. Otherwise, you risk exhausting yourself and confusing your customers.
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