Creating a video series and selling it as a digital download on your blog, much like an eBook, can be another great seller. A video course, teaching viewers a specific skill or how to achieve a particular activity, may well resonate with your audience. If you are going to go down this route then your videos need to be as professional as possible so you should consider investing in some video and lighting equipment, as well as editing software.
Trusted-Messenger/Endorsement Campaigns: This strategy hinges on finding a few key influencers in the niche market and enlisting them as spokespersons on behalf of a product or service. An example of this strategy would to hire Wilford Brimley (a longtime actor who is known and loved by many senior citizens) as spokesperson for medical products used frequently by the elderly. The success of these campaigns is highly contingent on the credibility of the spokesperson and the sincerity with which the endorsement is delivered.
Expansion is limited. If your goal is to stay a sole practitioner, this is not a problem. But if success for your business requires additional employees, you will likely outgrow the space you have at home. Moreover, do you even want employees in your home? You sacrifice a great deal of privacy and personal space when you allow others to work with you, especially if you don’t have dedicated space in your home.

Whether it’s an important consumer application, a specialist app to solve a particular niche problem, or even a time-wasting game you can play on your phone, you can create a massively successful business if you build software that helps people. (Look at the rise of Slack—the team communication software that went from side project to billion-dollar company in just 2 years.)


Niche marketing often focuses on market segments that are poorly targeted, or not targeted at all. Businesses that capitalize on the opportunities that lie in an untapped segment can open up the doors for an influx of success. Marketers identify the niches to target by identifying the desires and needs of consumers in specific segments. Efficiently tailoring a marketing campaign to a niche audience is crucial.
Knowing that you need to make every marketing dollar count, niche marketing can help you to abide by the Pareto Principle, better known as the 80/20 rule.  This theory purports that roughly 80% of your results will come from just 20% of your efforts. When applied to marketing in general, that means 80% of your efforts are not directly tied to your results. In other words, less is more, and this is where niche marketing comes in.

If you're looking to address some immediate financial needs, then the app economy is likely right for you. Thanks to the global sharing phenomenon, launched in part by our smartphones and ever-burgeoning global connectivity, you could easily opt for some quick active income by using well-known apps. From ride sharing to deliveries and even quick tasks, there's an app for that today, as the saying goes. 
Buy and sell domain names. If you’re good at finding popular yet undiscovered domain names, you can make some cash on the side by buying and reselling websites. Think of it as digital real estate speculation. Domains are available on GoDaddy.com for as little as $2.99 per year, but are sometimes resold at far higher prices: According to Business Insider, the site MM.com sold for $1.2 million dollars in 2014. Once you find the perfect domain name to resell, you can market it on Flippa.com for a flat fee.

You have more control over your schedule. If you’re a morning person, you can get up at 5 AM and start your workday. Clean out your email inbox, start on that next pitch and read today’s trade paper before you need to wake your kids up and get them off to school. Prefer evenings? When the family’s in bed and the house is quiet is the perfect time to work on your next client presentation. It’s difficult to keep such flexible hours when you’re at the mercy of an office complex. Should you have a half hour free, you can actually use that time to work instead of getting to work.
You can set up a website, gradually build up the content (articles, videos, podcasts, etc.), then eventually monetize the site through advertising, affiliate marketing, or even the direct sale of specific products or services. Even better, you can generally find whatever services and technical assistance you need online and free of charge. Later on, when your site develops a reliable cash flow, you can begin working with paid providers who can take your blog to the next level.
And don’t forget social media as a home-based business. Many churches, other non profit charities, and business owners NEED to advertise via social media. You can either be hired to do theirs or become a consultant who trains their staff. Many churches don’t know the Internet laws like an avid social media user does. They’ll need someone to teach them how to use social media and protect their organization while doing it. Ask me how I know. 😉 My husband and I have worked with some organizations who refused to listen and they ended up with some scandals. Take a gander at what happened to Pastor Alios Bell’s ministry reputation when someone who knows social media happened upon her indiscretion at Applebee’s. Google it. It went viral.
Cash Cow is one of the four categories under the Boston Consulting Group's growth matrix that represents a division which has a big market share in a low-growth industry or a sector. It is referred to an asset or a business, which once paid off, will continue giving consistent cash flows throughout its life. Description: A Cash Cow is a metaphor used for a business or a product, which exhibits
If you are more confident in your skills, you can also market directly to websites and blogs. You can contact the sites by email to market your services. That will also enable you to select the specific types of sites that you are more comfortable working with. Since there are literally thousands of websites and blogs on the web, the potential market is limitless.
The potential income is unlimited. Why? The business is crazy scalable. Start with a guided meditations YouTube channel and individual appointments via Skype. Once you have a following, create a virtual ashram and hire on other teachers, taking a cut of their earnings. Maybe there’s even a mindfulness app in your future. The founder of the virtual meditation empire, Headspace, went from broke to bling in a few short years (2).

Monetize a hobby. While some hobbies actually cost money, others can be transformed into a profitable business venture. Ultimately, it depends on what your hobby is and how talented you are. You could turn your love of photography, for example, into a part-time gig taking family portraits and wedding photos or selling prints on Etsy or at arts fairs.
Prior to that group, they had an online community for teachers looking for lesson plans. That probably sounds pretty random, but it's crazy the type of communities you can build and rally people around. If it's something that you're passionate about yourself and you want to connect with others that have that same passion, then an online community is something you should definitely consider.
There are no office politics. And no dress code! It’s true, you really can work in your pajamas if you want to (although you might feel more productive if you get dressed). Depending on whether you have any employees working with you at home, no one knows what you’re wearing and no one cares. Similarly, there’s no office pecking order and no gamesmanship from other workers.
If you know how to make jewelry, there’s really no reason not to sell it. Handmade jewelry has long held appeal for collectors and admirers alike. The biggest challenge to setting up a jewelry business might be running the business itself—just making beautiful things won’t be enough to sustain the operation. Study up on what it takes to run a jewelry business and then make it happen. A great place to start is online with sites like Etsy and eBay
My 10-year-old son brought home a book from our park’s free library box. It was a biology textbook – teachers edition. He said it looked interesting and hey, it was free (having no idea you could sell it). I scanned it in my Amazon seller app and realized it was worth around $150. He was so excited. We listed it for sale for $130 and it sold! Going to tell him, he just made $130!

A niche market is a subset of a larger market with its own particular needs or preferences, which may be different from the larger market. For example, within the market for women’s shoes are many different niches, or segments. Shoes for vegan women would be a niche market, as would shoes for plus-sized women, shoes for nurses, or even shoes for transvestites. These would all be niche markets within the larger women’s shoe market.
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